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home:diseases:schizophrenia [02.22.2019]
sallieq [More evidence]
home:diseases:schizophrenia [07.07.2019] (current)
sallieq [Evidence of infectious cause]
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   * **Prenatal infection and schizophrenia** – According to Alan S. Brown of Columbia University, "​Accumulating evidence suggests that prenatal exposure to infection contributes to the etiology of schizophrenia."​ In a 2006 study, Brown showed that prenatal infections such as rubella, influenza, and toxoplasmosis are all associated with higher incidence of schizophrenia.(({{pubmed>​long:​16469941}})) Brown found a seven-fold increased risk of schizophrenia when mothers were exposed to influenza in the first trimester of gestation. This work was echoed by a 2009 paper by Sørensen //et al.// who showed that bacterial infections (upper respiratory tract and gonococcal infections) were associated with elevated risk of the disease.(({{pubmed>​long:​18832344}}))   * **Prenatal infection and schizophrenia** – According to Alan S. Brown of Columbia University, "​Accumulating evidence suggests that prenatal exposure to infection contributes to the etiology of schizophrenia."​ In a 2006 study, Brown showed that prenatal infections such as rubella, influenza, and toxoplasmosis are all associated with higher incidence of schizophrenia.(({{pubmed>​long:​16469941}})) Brown found a seven-fold increased risk of schizophrenia when mothers were exposed to influenza in the first trimester of gestation. This work was echoed by a 2009 paper by Sørensen //et al.// who showed that bacterial infections (upper respiratory tract and gonococcal infections) were associated with elevated risk of the disease.(({{pubmed>​long:​18832344}}))
 +  * see also (({{pubmed>​long:​22488761}})),​ (({{pubmed>​long:​30068405}})),​ (({{pubmed>​long:​28463237}})),​ (({{pubmed>​long: ​   28844435}})),​ (({{pubmed>​long: ​   25464029}})) ​
  
   * **Increased suceptibility to other probable infectious diseases** - There is an increased prevalence of Sjogren'​s,​ hypothyreosis and rheumatoid arthritis in schizophrenia.(({{pubmed>​long:​9105757}})) ​   * **Increased suceptibility to other probable infectious diseases** - There is an increased prevalence of Sjogren'​s,​ hypothyreosis and rheumatoid arthritis in schizophrenia.(({{pubmed>​long:​9105757}})) ​
home/diseases/schizophrenia.1550879938.txt.gz · Last modified: 02.22.2019 by sallieq
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