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home:physicians:vitamin_d_leaflet [06.11.2018]
sallieq [Humans Are Not Tall Mice Without Tails!]
home:physicians:vitamin_d_leaflet [06.26.2018] (current)
sallieq [Humans Are Not Tall Mice Without Tails!]
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 Although early stage autoimmune disease often succumbs to antibiotic therapy, antibiotics appear to lose utility as disease progresses. Recent sequencing of microbial DNA has confirmed that some pathogens ensure their persistence by reducing expression of, and transcription by, the VDR nuclear receptor, which is at the heart of the human innate immune system. // 8,   10// Although early stage autoimmune disease often succumbs to antibiotic therapy, antibiotics appear to lose utility as disease progresses. Recent sequencing of microbial DNA has confirmed that some pathogens ensure their persistence by reducing expression of, and transcription by, the VDR nuclear receptor, which is at the heart of the human innate immune system. // 8,   10//
  
-Only in homo sapiens is the VDR responsible for expression of the Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, the primary ​defene ​of the intra-phagocytic innate immune system.  ​+Only in homo sapiens is the VDR responsible for expression of the Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, the primary ​defense ​of the intra-phagocytic innate immune system.  ​
  
 ==== Humans Are Not Tall Mice Without Tails! ==== ==== Humans Are Not Tall Mice Without Tails! ====
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 Importantly,​ the innate immune functions of the VDR are unique to Homo sapiens. In Homo sapiens, and only in Homo sapiens, there is one nuclear receptor, the VDR, which expresses genes for TLR2, as well as the cathelicidin and beta-defensin anti-microbial peptides, all of these are essential to the intracellular innate immune defences.  ​ Importantly,​ the innate immune functions of the VDR are unique to Homo sapiens. In Homo sapiens, and only in Homo sapiens, there is one nuclear receptor, the VDR, which expresses genes for TLR2, as well as the cathelicidin and beta-defensin anti-microbial peptides, all of these are essential to the intracellular innate immune defences.  ​
  
-You cannot study the vitamin D receptor in mice, how it relates to the immune system, and expect it to translate to Homo sapiens. Whereas in man the VDR transcribes cathelicidin,​ which is the primary anti-microbial producing peptides that protect the phagocytes themselves. And TLR2, the primary toll-like receptor which detects pathogens inside the macrophages,​ there is no such homology in mice.  //9// +You cannot study the vitamin D receptor in mice, how it relates to the immune system, and expect it to translate to Homo sapiens. Whereas in man the VDR transcribes cathelicidin,​ which is the primary anti-microbial producing peptides that protect the phagocytes themselves ​and TLR2, the primary toll-like receptor which detects pathogens inside the macrophages,​ there is no such homology in mice.  //9// 
  
 In mice, there are other receptors, and other genes that do that. Even the higher primates do not emulate the cathelicidin innate immunity of Homo sapiens. ​ In mice, there are other receptors, and other genes that do that. Even the higher primates do not emulate the cathelicidin innate immunity of Homo sapiens. ​
home/physicians/vitamin_d_leaflet.1528761246.txt.gz · Last modified: 06.11.2018 by sallieq
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