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home:diseases:fibromyalgia [02.28.2019]
sallieq [Data]
home:diseases:fibromyalgia [03.15.2019] (current)
sallieq [Fibromyalgia]
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 Fibromyalgia is a common syndrome of chronic widespread soft-tissue pain accompanied by weakness, fatigue, and sleep disturbances. It is characterized by chronic widespread aching and stiffness, involving particularly the neck, shoulders, back, and hips, which is aggravated by use of the affected muscles. ​ Fibromyalgia is a common syndrome of chronic widespread soft-tissue pain accompanied by weakness, fatigue, and sleep disturbances. It is characterized by chronic widespread aching and stiffness, involving particularly the neck, shoulders, back, and hips, which is aggravated by use of the affected muscles. ​
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 +Three types of overlap occur among the disease states chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia (FM), multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They share common symptoms. ​  ​(({{pubmed>​long:​11461161}}))  ​
  
 According to the Marshall Pathogenesis,​ fibromyalgia is caused by groups of microbes which downregulate activity of the Vitamin D Receptor, a nuclear receptor which plays a key role in maintaining the function of the innate immune response. Physical or psychological stress may exacerbate the disease, but it should not be considered ultimately responsible for it. According to the Marshall Pathogenesis,​ fibromyalgia is caused by groups of microbes which downregulate activity of the Vitamin D Receptor, a nuclear receptor which plays a key role in maintaining the function of the innate immune response. Physical or psychological stress may exacerbate the disease, but it should not be considered ultimately responsible for it.
home/diseases/fibromyalgia.txt · Last modified: 03.15.2019 by sallieq
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