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Health, Food and drink

The Marshall ProtocolA curative medical treatment for chronic inflammatory disease. Based on the Marshall Pathogenesis. is not a diet; however, people on the Marshall Protocol must be aware of

what types of foods they consume.

Patients on the Marshall Protocol (MP) must avoid all food and drink that:

• contains supplemental vitamin D or high levels of naturally-occurring vitamin D,

• contains ergosterol, a vitamin D precursor that the body can convert to vitamin D

• that are immunomodulatory (can slow down the action of the innate immune system)

MP patients must avoid supplements and multivitamins containing supplemental folic acid, and

try to limit intake of foods containing supplemental folic acid.

Requirements

The MP does not endorse any particular diet, as food sensitivities are often just another symptom of inflammatory disease and vary widely from patient to patient. Based on current knowledge, it is not considered likely that changes in diet alone will significantly impact the disease process. However, due to the involvement of exogenous vitamin D and carbohydrates in the proliferation of the Th1 pathogens, MP patients must take certain precautions when selecting foods.

A number of cereals are supplemented with vitamin D.

Avoid foods containing supplemental vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain supplemental vitamin D. Read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of each purchase and look for the words “vitamin D” or see if vitamin D is listed in the nutrition information.

• dairy products with more than 6% vitamin A (more than 6% vitamin A may indicate that vitamin D has been added as well, but is not included on the nutritional information)

• milk alternatives - soy milk, any milk alternative with added vitamin D, including rice, almond, coconut, hemp, and hazelnut milks. (canned coconut milk used for cooking in many asian cuisines is rarely supplemented with Vitamin D)

• margarine with more than 6% vitamin A

• fortified drinks - meal-replacement drinks, protein drinks, fruit juice

• vitamin-fortified breakfast cereals

• cereal bars and nutrition bars

For some people they will find that their 25D rises after a few months on the MP. This may be due to a hidden source of D in their food/supplements, combined with the fact that the 25D is no longer rapidly converting to 1,25D as it was before starting the Benicar.

You would be surprised where those hidden sources of D turn up. Some on the MP have found that they had to forgo grain beers, realized they were eating foods with mushrooms in them, taking a “harmless supplement” with D in it, or discovered their yogurt or ice cream was made with D fortified milk … to name a few scenarios.

Joyful, MarshallProtocol.com

Even healthy people would be better off avoiding all forms of Pharmaceutically produced “vitamin” D, since research is showing that over time, it does not produce the vast majority of improvements claimed for it, but does cause various harmful effects.

Avoid foods containing supplemental folic acid

Bacteria use folic acid in order to synthesize the nucleic acids that make up their DNA. MP patients should read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of each purchase and look for the words “folic acid.” Note that foods naturally high in folate, a natural source of folic acid, such as leafy green vegetables are permitted.

  • white flour
  • “enriched” flour products - breads, baked goods, cereals
  • processed foods supplemented with folic acid
  • most multivitamins
  • folic acid supplements
  • B-vitamin complexes

Avoid foods containing naturally-occurring vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain high levels of naturally occurring vitamin D:

• fish, including salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, perch, anchovies, caviar (roe), Worcestershire Sauce (contains anchovies), fish sauce (often found in asian foods), Caesar salad dressing (contains anchovies)

• some shellfish, especially oysters, shrimp, crayfish (lobster, crab, scallops are ok)

• egg yolks (whites are not prohibited), ranch and Caesar salad dressing, mayonnaise

• fatty and/or organ meats, including bacon, any kind of liver, beef tripe, beef

kidney, blood pudding, foods fried in pork lard

• some “vegetables” - mushrooms (due to ergosterol content, a vitamin D precursor),

alfalfa, seaweed, kelp/alginate (used an ingredient in certain food processes)

• most beers (may contain small amounts of vitamin D from grains used to make it, or from the ergosterol present in the yeast used to brew the beer)

A complete list of foods containing natural and supplemental vitamin D is available.

Avoid foods and substances which may exacerbate the disease process, or are immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory

• certain additives - aspartame, monosodium glutamate (MSG), tartrazine (FD&C Yellow#5)

• soy, soy oil and tofu - these contain phytoestrogens, which may block the Vitamin D ReceptorA nuclear receptor located throughout the body that plays a key role in the innate immune response. (VDRThe Vitamin D Receptor. A nuclear receptor located throughout the body that plays a key role in the innate immune response.) in large enough

quantities

• Foods high amounts of omega-3 or omega-6 oils – these oils are immunosuppressive. Seeds (sunflower, sesame, flax,

chia, pumpkin, also known as pepita), seed oils (sunflower, safflower, flaxseed, grapeseed), avocado and avocado oil

• food and drink that contains chlorogenic acidAn antioxidant and phenolic compound which in ways that are not yet fully clear can modulate and/or suppress the immune response, which may block the Vitamin D Receptor in large enough quantities,

such as coffee, tea, fruit skins. Caffeine may also interfere with immunity Caffeine down-regulates antibody production in a mouse model

• grapefruit and possibly starfruit appear to interfere with vitamin D metabolism, should therefore be avoided

• Foods high in potassium, if pain in the kidneys becomes a problem (bananas, dry beans, dried apricots, the skins

of fruits and vegetables, electrolyte replacement drinks)

Alcohol does not appear to exacerbate the disease process; consumption is left to individual discretion.

Recommendations

MP patients should consume a diet low in simple carbohydrates and rich in whole foods. Acceptable foods include the following:

  • most vegetables (limit starchy vegetables, such as potatoes)
  • low-sugar fruits (such as berries, peaches, and green apples)
  • foods that naturally contain folic acid, such as leafy greens
  • dairy products that have had minimal processing and with no more than 6% vitamin A and no supplemental vitamin D
  • a variety of proteins, including poultry and most unprocessed meat. Avoid meat fats and poultry skin
  • nuts and seeds not listed above (for example: almonds, walnuts, pine, pecan, pistaschio, macadamia, hazelnut)
  • whole grain products without added vitamin D or folate
  • sugar alcohols and some artificial sweeteners, such as stevia, maltitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can cause stomach upset, so use sparingly at first.
  • water, generously but not excessively. 8 – 12 oz glasses per day.
  • in the event of calcium deficiency, MP patients may need to consume foods high in calcium
  • foods high in fiber

Cholesterol

harmful LDL is found in animal products, notably egg yolk, milk, mayonnaise, butter, eggnog, cream, hard and soft cheeses, cottage cheese, sour cream, ice cream and yogurt.

Cholesterol-lowering foods include oat bran, garlic, almonds, walnuts, whole barley, and green tea. See a detailed list of foods which lower bad LDL cholesterol, while leaving the good HDL cholesterol largely unaffected. Top 10 by Daisy Whitbread, MScN

Minerals

Some trace elements are altered with chronic kidney disease. Selenium, zinc, and manganese tend to be wasted, and there is growing evidence that selenium deficiency is associated with mortality on dialysis.

Other trace elements accumulate, such as chromium, cobalt, lead, molybdenum, and vanadium.1)

see also colloidal silver

Three main areas of research have been identified (in chronic heart failure): 1) magnesium, electrolytes and CHF; 2) the transcriptional and antioxidant effects of zinc, selenium, copper; 3) iron-deficiency anemia and CHF.2)

Zinc

Zinc is an essential trace element that is crucial for growth, development, and maintenance of immune function. Its influence reaches all organs and cell types, representing an integral component of approximately 10% of the human proteome, and encompassing hundreds of key enzymes and transcription factors. Zinc deficiency is strikingly common, affecting up to a quarter of the population in developing countries, but also affecting distinct populations in the developed world as a result of lifestyle, age, and disease-mediated factors. 3)

By modulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways, zinc supplementation is recommended for the treatment of several ailments, such as liver disease, male hypogonadism, cancers, heart disease (e.g. dyslipidemia) and central nervous system disorders; however, the topic of dietary vs. pharmacological doses of zinc remains controversial.4)

Results suggest that zinc deficiency is associated with the presence of prehypertension in apparently healthy subjects.5)

Ca/Mg ratio

Ca/Mg ratio imbalance is associated with prostatic hyperplasia6)

Ca:Mg rose from largely below 3.0 in 1994-5 to generally above or approaching 3.0 after 2000, coinciding with a sharp 2% rise in type 2 diabetes incidence and prevalence in the USA population and a 1994-2005 rise in colorectal cancer incidence among young white, non-Hispanic adult men and women in the USA.7)

findings suggested that increased Mg and decreased Ca and Ca/Mg in whole blood were correlated with metabolic syndrome in Chinese adults.8)

Iodine

Iodine is necessary for thyroid function. 9)

If your thyroid does not come good after some time on MP, get your Iodine status checked, An occasional drop of iodine may be warranted. Your doctor will advise.

Those who are not iodine deficient should not supplement, and are better to avoid iodised salt.

Iron

Fe supplement is contra-indicated for MP patients. Some pathogens thrive on Fe, producing anemia of inflammatory response.

Selenium (trace element)

Association of Selenium (Se) deficiency, an essential trace element, has been found with human diseases.10)

Review of recent progress in large-scale and systematic analyses of the relationship between selenium status or selenoproteins and several complex diseases, mainly including population-based cohort studies and meta-analyses, genetic association studies, and some other omics-based studies. Advances in ionomics and its application in studying the interaction between selenium and other trace elements in human health and diseases are also discussed.11)

Expression of some genes is changed with selenium deficiency. Consequently, growth and proliferation of cells, their movement, development, death, and survival, as well as the interaction between cells, the redox regulation of intracellular signaling cascades of inflammationThe complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens or damaged cells. It is a protective attempt by the organism to remove the injurious stimuli as well as initiate the healing process for the tissue. and apoptosis, depend on the selenium status of the body.

Organic selenium compounds have a high bioavailability and, depending on their concentration, can act both as selenium donors to prevent selenium deficiency and as antitumor drugs due to their toxicity and participation in the regulation of signaling pathways of apoptosis. 12)

Boron (trace element)

Via its effect on steroid hormones and interaction with mineral metabolism, boron may be involved in a number of clinical conditions such as arthritis. 13)

Experiments with boron supplementation or deprivation show that boron is involved in calcium and bone metabolism, and its effects are more marked when other nutrients (cholecalciferol, magnesium) are deficient. Boron supplementation increases the serum concentration of 17 beta-estradiol and testosterone but boron excess has toxic effects on reproductive function. Boron may be involved in cerebral function via its effects on the transport across membranes. It affects the synthesis of the extracellular matrix and is beneficial in wound healing.

Usual dietary boron consumption in humans is 1-2 mg/day for adults.

Boronated compounds have been shown to be potent anti-osteoporotic, anti-inflammatory, hypolipemic, anti-coagulant and anti-neoplastic agents both in vitroA technique of performing a given procedure in a controlled environment outside of a living organism - usually a laboratory. and in vivoA type of scientific study that analyzes an organism in its natural living environment. in animals.14)

In reality the average intake in developed countries is 1-2 mg of boron per day. Institutionalized patients may receive only 0.25 mg of daily boron. Chemical fertilizers inhibit the uptake of boron from the soil: an organic apple grown in good soil may have 20 mg boron, but if grown with fertilizer it may have only 1 mg of boron. Fertilizers combined with poor food choices have greatly reduced our boron intake compared to 50 or 100 years ago.

Further, unhealthy cooking methods greatly reduce the availability of boron from food. The cooking water of vegetables containing most of the minerals may be discarded during home cooking or commercial processing; phytic acid in baked goods, cereals and cooked legumes may greatly reduce availability, while gluten sensitivity and Candida overgrowth inhibit the absorption of minerals. All this makes health problems due to boron deficiency now very common.

Educate yourself by Walter Last July 2912

Research

Considerations for best practices in studies of fiber or other dietary components and the intestinal microbiome. 15)

Walnut Consumption Alters the Gastrointestinal MicrobiotaThe bacterial community which causes chronic diseases - one which almost certainly includes multiple species and bacterial forms., Microbially Derived Secondary Bile Acids, and Health Markers in Healthy Adults16)

Almond Consumption and Processing Affects the Composition of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adult Men and Women 17)

Broccoli consumption affects the human gastrointestinal microbiota. Functional prediction revealed that broccoli consumption increased the pathways involved in the functions of the endocrine system (P=.05), transport and catabolism (P=.04), and energy metabolism (P=.01). 18)

Dietary fats influence risk of developing peripheral metabolic diseases and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer?s disease (AD). Inflammation of the brain (neuroinflammation), a state associated with progressive neuronal loss, is known to be heightened in cognitive decline and obesity. Obesity and associated comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes affect up to 48% of Veterans. We hypothesize that dietary fats alter microglial metabolism to directly trigger dysregulated brain immune responses.

Department of Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia has specified that immune cells in the brain consume the synapses between brain neurons, when exposed to a high-fat diet. High fat diet and microglia in mice.

Other

how-the-western-diet-has-derailed-our-evolution

  • fasting – Fasting is not part of the MP. It is unknown whether it provides harm or benefit to a person on the treatment.
  • food avoidance diets – Some patients have reported sensitivities to certain foods. Avoiding foods containing, for example, lactose or gluten may offer a decrease in symptom severity. Patients who feel this may be relevant to them should consult with a nutritionist.
  • salt avoidance – not recommended given that the body seems to naturally regulate sodium levels independently. Salt is also critical for kidney health. Sodium is used by the kidneys to excrete potassium. 19) 20) (for more see the Times article Salt, we misjudged you

Notes and comments

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Gillyb's update TEXT without LINKS

FOOD AND DRINK MPKB EDIT – 9/9/13 edit by Gilly Food and drink

The Marshall Protocol is not a diet; however, people on the Marshall Protocol must be aware of

what types of foods they consume.

Patients on the Marshall Protocol (MP) must avoid all food and drink that:

• contains supplemental vitamin D or high levels of naturally-occurring vitamin D,

• contains ergosterol, a vitamin D precursor that the body can convert to vitamin D

• that are immunomodulatory (can slow down the action of the innate immune system)

MP patients must avoid supplements and multivitamins containing supplemental folic acid, and

try to limit intake of foods containing supplemental folic acid.

Requirements

The MP does not endorse any particular diet, as food sensitivities are often just another symptom

of inflammatory disease and vary widely from patient to patient, although a low carbohydrate

diet has some benefits (see the section on carbohydrates). Based on current knowledge, it is

not considered likely that changes in diet alone will significantly impact the disease process.

However, due to the involvement of exogenous vitamin D and carbohydrates in the proliferation

of the Th1 pathogensThe community of bacterial pathogens which cause chronic inflammatory disease - one which almost certainly includes multiple species and bacterial forms., MP patients must take certain precautions when selecting foods. As a

result of popular misconceptions about vitamin D’s role in health, many foods are directly

supplemented with vitamin D, or animal feeds are supplemented with vitamin D to increase the

amount in the animal’s tissues.

A number of cereals are supplemented with vitamin D.

Avoid foods containing naturally-occurring vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain high levels of naturally occurring vitamin D:

• seafood, including salmon, tuna, mackerel, oysters, herring, perch, scallops, shrimp,

lobster, clams, crab, crayfish, anchovies, caviar (roe), Worcestershire Sauce (contains

anchovies), fish sauce (often found in asian foods), Caesar salad dressing (contains

anchovies)

• egg yolks (whites are not prohibited), ranch and Caesar salad dressing, mayonnaise

• fatty and/or organ meats, including bacon, any kind of liver, beef tripe, beef kidney,

blood pudding, foods fried in pork lard

• some “vegetables” - mushrooms (due to ergosterol content, a vitamin D precursor), alfalfa, seaweed, kelp

(used an ingredient in certain food processes),

• most beers (may contain small amounts of vitamin D from grains used to make it, or from

the ergosterol present in the yeast used to brew the beer)

A complete list of foods containing natural and supplemental vitamin D is available.

Avoid foods containing supplemental vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain supplemental vitamin D. MP

patients should read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of

each purchase and look for the words “vitamin D.“ or see if vitamin D is listed in the nutrition information.

• dairy products with more than 6% vitamin A (more than 6% vitamin A may indicate that

vitamin D has been added as well, but is not included on the nutritional information)

• milk alternatives - soy milk, any milk alternative with added vitamin D, including rice,

almond, coconut, hemp, hazelnut

• margarine with more than 6% vitamin A

• fortified drinks - meal-replacement drinks, protein drinks, fruit juice

• vitamin-fortified breakfast cereals

• cereal bars and nutrition bars

Some people find that their 25D rises after a few months on the MP. This may be due to a hidden

source of D in their food/supplements, combined with the fact that the 25D is no longer rapidly

converting to 1,25D as it was before starting olmesartanMedication taken regularly by patients on the Marshall Protocol for its ability to activate the Vitamin D Receptor. Also known by the trade name Benicar. .

You would be surprised where those hidden sources of D turn up. Some on the MP have found

that they had to forgo grain beers, realized they were eating foods with mushrooms in them,

taking a “harmless supplement” with D in it, or discovered their yogurt or ice cream was made

with D fortified milk … to name a few scenarios.

Joyful, MarshallProtocol.com

Avoid foods containing supplemental folic acid

Bacteria use folic acid to synthesize the nucleic acids that make up their DNA. MP patients

should read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of each

purchase and look for the words “folic acid.” Note that foods naturally high in folate, a natural

source of folic acid, such as leafy green vegetables are permitted.

• “enriched “ white or whole wheat flour

• products made from “enriched” flours - breads, baked goods, cereals

• processed foods supplemented with folic acid

• most multivitamins

• folic acid supplements

• B-vitamin complexes

Avoid foods and substances which may exacerbate the disease process, are

immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory

• certain additives - aspartame, monosodium glutamate (MSG), tartrazine (FD&C Yellow

#5)

• soy, soy oil and tofu - contains phytoestrogens, which may block the Vitamin D

Receptor (VDR) in large enough quantities

• Foods high amounts of omega-3 or omega-6 oils – these oils are immunosuppressive.

Seeds (sunflower, sesame, flax, chia, pumpkin, also known as pepita), seed oils

(sunflower, safflower, flaxseed, grapeseed), avocado and avocado oil

• food and drink that contains chlorogenic acid, which may block the Vitamin D Receptor

in large enough quantities, such as coffee, tea, fruit skins

• grapefruit and possibly starfruit appear to interfere with vitamin D metabolism1

should therefore be avoided

• Foods high in potassium, if pain in the kidneys becomes a problem (bananas, dry beans,

dried apricots, the skins of fruits and vegetables, electrolyte replacement drinks)

Alcohol does not appear to exacerbate the disease process; consumption is left to individual

discretion. Alcohol can carry a large carbohydrate load, in the form of added sugars or

flavorings.

Recommendations

MP patients should consume a diet low in simple carbohydrates and rich in whole foods. Avoid

highly processed foods, due to the likely presence of undesirable additives, including unlisted

vitamin D. Acceptable foods include the following:

• most vegetables (limit starchy vegetables, such as potatoes)

• low-sugar fruits (such as berries, peaches, and green apples)

• foods that naturally contain folic acid, such as leafy greens

• dairy products that have had minimal processing, or with no more than 6% vitamin A and no

supplemental vitamin D

• a variety of proteins, including that which comes from poultry and most unprocessed meat.

Avoid meat fats and poultry skin

• nuts and seeds not listed above (for example: almonds, walnuts, pine, pecan, pistaschio,

macadamia, hazelnut)

• whole grain products without added vitamin D or folate

• certain artificial sweeteners, such as stevia and sugar alcohols, such as maltitol and xylitol. For some

people, sugar alcohols can cause stomach upset, so use sparingly at first.

• water, generously but not excessively. 8 – 12 oz glasses per day.

• in the event of calcium deficiency, MP patients may need to consume foods high in

calcium

• foods high in fiber, to encourage regularity

Other

• fasting – Fasting is not part of the MP. It is unknown whether it provides harm or benefit

to a person on the treatment.

• food avoidance diets – Some patients have reported sensitivities to certain foods.

Avoiding foods containing, for example, lactose or gluten may offer a decrease in

symptom severity. Patients who feel this may be relevant to them should consult a

nutritionist.

• salt avoidance – not recommended given that the body seems to naturally regulate

sodium levels independently. Salt is also critical for kidney health. Sodium is used by the kidneys to

excrete potassium.

Keywords: foods, drinks, summary, foods to avoid

References

1

Maskalyk J Grapefruit juice: potential drug interactions. CMAJ. 2002;167:279-80.

2

McCarron DA, Geerling JC, Kazaks AG, Stern JS Can dietary sodium intake be modified by

public policy? Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009;4:1878-82.

2

(for more see the Times article Salt, we misjudged

References

1)
Chromium: Rise and Shine in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients?
Filler G, McIntyre C
Perit Dial Int39p320-322(2019 Jul-Aug)
2)
[Systematic Analysis of the Roles of Trace Elements in the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure].
Gromova OA, Torshin IY, Kobalava ZD, Nazarenko AG
Kardiologiia59p26-34(2019 Jun 5)
3)
The Role of Zinc in Antiviral Immunity.
Read SA, Obeid S, Ahlenstiel C, Ahlenstiel G
Adv Nutr10p696-710(2019 Jul 1)
4)
Dietary vs. pharmacological doses of zinc: A clinical review.
Santos HO, Teixeira FJ, Schoenfeld BJ
Clin Nutrp(2019 Jul 4)
5)
Zinc deficiency is an independent risk factor for prehypertension in healthy subjects.
Nevárez-López SC, Simental-Mendía LE, Guerrero-Romero F, Burciaga-Nava JA
Int J Vitam Nutr Resp1-6(2019 Jul 1)
6)
Calcium - Magnesium imbalance implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia and restoration by a phytotherapeutic drug - Croton membranaceus Müll.Arg.
Asare GA, Ngala RA, Afriyie D, Adjei S, Nyarko A, Anang-Quartey Y, Asiedu B, Doku D, Amoah BY, Bentum K, Musah I, Mossanda K
BMC Complement Altern Med17p152(2017 Mar 11)
7)
9)
Association of Iodine and Iron with Thyroid Function.
Luo J, Hendryx M, Dinh P, He K
Biol Trace Elem Res179p38-44(2017 Sep)
10)
Effect of Selenium on Thyroid Disorders: Scientometric Analysis.
Pakdel F, Ghazavi R, Heidary R, Nezamabadi A, Parvizi M, Haji Safar Ali Memar M, Gharebaghi R, Heidary F
Iran J Public Health48p410-420(2019 Mar)
11)
Systems Biology of Selenium and Complex Disease.
Ying H, Zhang Y
Biol Trace Elem Resp(2019 Jun 24)
12)
[Selenium compounds in redox regulation of inflammation and apoptosis].
Rusetskaya NY, Fedotov IV, Koftina VA, Borodulin VB
Biomed Khim65p165-179(2019 Apr)
13)
The role of boron in nutrition and metabolism.
Naghii MR, Samman S
Prog Food Nutr Sci17p331-49(1993 Oct-Dec)
14)
In vivo and in vitro effects of boron and boronated compounds.
Benderdour M, Bui-Van T, Dicko A, Belleville F
J Trace Elem Med Biol12p2-7(1998 Mar)
15)
Considerations for best practices in studies of fiber or other dietary components and the intestinal microbiome.
Klurfeld DM, Davis CD, Karp RW, Allen-Vercoe E, Chang EB, Chassaing B, Fahey GC Jr, Hamaker BR, Holscher HD, Lampe JW, Marette A, Martens E, O'Keefe SJ, Rose DJ, Saarela M, Schneeman BO, Slavin JL, Sonnenburg JL, Swanson KS, Wu GD, Lynch CJ
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab315pE1087-E1097(2018 Dec 1)
16)
Walnut Consumption Alters the Gastrointestinal Microbiota, Microbially Derived Secondary Bile Acids, and Health Markers in Healthy Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
Holscher HD, Guetterman HM, Swanson KS, An R, Matthan NR, Lichtenstein AH, Novotny JA, Baer DJ
J Nutr148p861-867(2018 Jun 1)
18)
Broccoli consumption affects the human gastrointestinal microbiota.
Kaczmarek JL, Liu X, Charron CS, Novotny JA, Jeffery EH, Seifried HE, Ross SA, Miller MJ, Swanson KS, Holscher HD
J Nutr Biochem63p27-34(2019 Jan)
19)
Can dietary sodium intake be modified by public policy?
McCarron DA, Geerling JC, Kazaks AG, Stern JS
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol4p1878-82(2009 Nov)
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