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Food and drink

The Marshall ProtocolA curative medical treatment for chronic inflammatory disease. Based on the Marshall Pathogenesis. is not a diet; however, people on the Marshall Protocol must be aware of

what types of foods they consume.

Patients on the Marshall Protocol (MP) must avoid all food and drink that:

• contains supplemental vitamin D or high levels of naturally-occurring vitamin D,

• contains ergosterol, a vitamin D precursor that the body can convert to vitamin D

• that are immunomodulatory (can slow down the action of the innate immune system)

MP patients must avoid supplements and multivitamins containing supplemental folic acid, and

try to limit intake of foods containing supplemental folic acid.

Requirements

The MP does not endorse any particular diet, as food sensitivities are often just another symptom of inflammatory disease and vary widely from patient to patient. Based on current knowledge, it is not considered likely that changes in diet alone will significantly impact the disease process. However, due to the involvement of exogenous vitamin D and carbohydrates in the proliferation of the Th1 pathogens, MP patients must take certain precautions when selecting foods.

A number of cereals are supplemented with vitamin D.

Avoid foods containing naturally-occurring vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain high levels of naturally occurring vitamin D:

• fish, including salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, perch, anchovies, caviar (roe), Worcestershire Sauce (contains anchovies), fish sauce (often found in asian foods), Caesar salad dressing (contains anchovies)

• some shellfish, especially oysters, shrimp, crayfish (lobster, crab, scallops are ok)

• egg yolks (whites are not prohibited), ranch and Caesar salad dressing, mayonnaise

• fatty and/or organ meats, including bacon, any kind of liver, beef tripe, beef

kidney, blood pudding, foods fried in pork lard

• some “vegetables” - mushrooms (due to ergosterol content, a vitamin D precursor),

alfalfa, seaweed, kelp/alginate (used an ingredient in certain food processes)

• most beers (may contain small amounts of vitamin D from grains used to make it, or from the ergosterol present in the yeast used to brew the beer)

A complete list of foods containing natural and supplemental vitamin D is available.

Avoid foods containing supplemental vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain supplemental vitamin D. Read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of each purchase and look for the words “vitamin D” or see if vitamin D is listed in the nutrition information.

• dairy products with more than 6% vitamin A (more than 6% vitamin A may indicate that vitamin D has been added as well, but is not included on the nutritional information)

• milk alternatives - soy milk, any milk alternative with added vitamin D, including rice, almond, coconut, hemp, hazelnut (canned coconut milk used for cooking in many asian cuisines is rarely supplemented with Vitamin D)

• margarine with more than 6% vitamin A

• fortified drinks - meal-replacement drinks, protein drinks, fruit juice

• vitamin-fortified breakfast cereals

• cereal bars and nutrition bars

For some people they will find that their 25D rises after a few months on the MP. This may be due to a hidden source of D in their food/supplements, combined with the fact that the 25D is no longer rapidly converting to 1,25D as it was before starting the Benicar.

You would be surprised where those hidden sources of D turn up. Some on the MP have found that they had to forgo grain beers, realized they were eating foods with mushrooms in them, taking a “harmless supplement” with D in it, or discovered their yogurt or ice cream was made with D fortified milk … to name a few scenarios.

Joyful, MarshallProtocol.com

Avoid foods containing supplemental folic acid

Bacteria use folic acid in order to synthesize the nucleic acids that make up their DNA. MP patients should read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of each purchase and look for the words “folic acid.” Note that foods naturally high in folate, a natural source of folic acid, such as leafy green vegetables are permitted.

  • white flour
  • “enriched” flour products - breads, baked goods, cereals
  • processed foods supplemented with folic acid
  • most multivitamins
  • folic acid supplements
  • B-vitamin complexes

Avoid foods and substances which may exacerbate the disease process, or are immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory

• certain additives - aspartame, monosodium glutamate (MSG), tartrazine (FD&C Yellow#5)

• soy, soy oil and tofu - these contain phytoestrogens, which may block the Vitamin D ReceptorA nuclear receptor located throughout the body that plays a key role in the innate immune response. (VDRThe Vitamin D Receptor. A nuclear receptor located throughout the body that plays a key role in the innate immune response.) in large enough

quantities

• Foods high amounts of omega-3 or omega-6 oils – these oils are immunosuppressive. Seeds (sunflower, sesame, flax,

chia, pumpkin, also known as pepita), seed oils (sunflower, safflower, flaxseed, grapeseed), avocado and avocado oil

• food and drink that contains chlorogenic acidAn antioxidant and phenolic compound which in ways that are not yet fully clear can modulate and/or suppress the immune response, which may block the Vitamin D Receptor in large enough quantities,

such as coffee, tea, fruit skins. Caffeine may also interfere with immunity Caffeine down-regulates antibody production in a mouse model

• grapefruit and possibly starfruit appear to interfere with vitamin D metabolism, should therefore be avoided

• Foods high in potassium, if pain in the kidneys becomes a problem (bananas, dry beans, dried apricots, the skins

of fruits and vegetables, electrolyte replacement drinks)

Alcohol does not appear to exacerbate the disease process; consumption is left to individual discretion.

Recommendations

MP patients should consume a diet low in simple carbohydrates and rich in whole foods. Acceptable foods include the following:

  • most vegetables (limit starchy vegetables, such as potatoes)
  • low-sugar fruits (such as berries, peaches, and green apples)
  • foods that naturally contain folic acid, such as leafy greens
  • dairy products that have had minimal processing and with no more than 6% vitamin A and no supplemental vitamin D
  • a variety of proteins, including poultry and most unprocessed meat. Avoid meat fats and poultry skin
  • nuts and seeds not listed above (for example: almonds, walnuts, pine, pecan, pistaschio, macadamia, hazelnut)
  • whole grain products without added vitamin D or folate
  • sugar alcohols and some artificial sweeteners, such as stevia, maltitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can cause stomach upset, so use sparingly at first.
  • water, generously but not excessively. 8 – 12 oz glasses per day.
  • in the event of calcium deficiency, MP patients may need to consume foods high in calcium
  • foods high in fiber

Other

  • fasting – Fasting is not part of the MP. It is unknown whether it provides harm or benefit to a person on the treatment.
  • food avoidance diets – Some patients have reported sensitivities to certain foods. Avoiding foods containing, for example, lactose or gluten may offer a decrease in symptom severity. Patients who feel this may be relevant to them should consult with a nutritionist.
  • salt avoidance – not recommended given that the body seems to naturally regulate sodium levels independently. Salt is also critical for kidney health. Sodium is used by the kidneys to excrete potassium. 1) (for more see the Times article Salt, we misjudged you

Notes and comments

Gillyb's update TEXT without LINKS

FOOD AND DRINK MPKB EDIT – 9/9/13 edit by Gilly Food and drink

The Marshall Protocol is not a diet; however, people on the Marshall Protocol must be aware of

what types of foods they consume.

Patients on the Marshall Protocol (MP) must avoid all food and drink that:

• contains supplemental vitamin D or high levels of naturally-occurring vitamin D,

• contains ergosterol, a vitamin D precursor that the body can convert to vitamin D

• that are immunomodulatory (can slow down the action of the innate immune system)

MP patients must avoid supplements and multivitamins containing supplemental folic acid, and

try to limit intake of foods containing supplemental folic acid.

Requirements

The MP does not endorse any particular diet, as food sensitivities are often just another symptom

of inflammatory disease and vary widely from patient to patient, although a low carbohydrate

diet has some benefits (see the section on carbohydrates). Based on current knowledge, it is

not considered likely that changes in diet alone will significantly impact the disease process.

However, due to the involvement of exogenous vitamin D and carbohydrates in the proliferation

of the Th1 pathogensThe community of bacterial pathogens which cause chronic inflammatory disease - one which almost certainly includes multiple species and bacterial forms., MP patients must take certain precautions when selecting foods. As a

result of popular misconceptions about vitamin D’s role in health, many foods are directly

supplemented with vitamin D, or animal feeds are supplemented with vitamin D to increase the

amount in the animal’s tissues.

A number of cereals are supplemented with vitamin D.

Avoid foods containing naturally-occurring vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain high levels of naturally occurring vitamin D:

• seafood, including salmon, tuna, mackerel, oysters, herring, perch, scallops, shrimp,

lobster, clams, crab, crayfish, anchovies, caviar (roe), Worcestershire Sauce (contains

anchovies), fish sauce (often found in asian foods), Caesar salad dressing (contains

anchovies)

• egg yolks (whites are not prohibited), ranch and Caesar salad dressing, mayonnaise

• fatty and/or organ meats, including bacon, any kind of liver, beef tripe, beef kidney,

blood pudding, foods fried in pork lard

• some “vegetables” - mushrooms (due to ergosterol content, a vitamin D precursor), alfalfa, seaweed, kelp

(used an ingredient in certain food processes),

• most beers (may contain small amounts of vitamin D from grains used to make it, or from

the ergosterol present in the yeast used to brew the beer)

A complete list of foods containing natural and supplemental vitamin D is available.

Avoid foods containing supplemental vitamin D

MP patients must avoid foods including the following that contain supplemental vitamin D. MP

patients should read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of

each purchase and look for the words “vitamin D.“ or see if vitamin D is listed in the nutrition information.

• dairy products with more than 6% vitamin A (more than 6% vitamin A may indicate that

vitamin D has been added as well, but is not included on the nutritional information)

• milk alternatives - soy milk, any milk alternative with added vitamin D, including rice,

almond, coconut, hemp, hazelnut

• margarine with more than 6% vitamin A

• fortified drinks - meal-replacement drinks, protein drinks, fruit juice

• vitamin-fortified breakfast cereals

• cereal bars and nutrition bars

Some people find that their 25D rises after a few months on the MP. This may be due to a hidden

source of D in their food/supplements, combined with the fact that the 25D is no longer rapidly

converting to 1,25D as it was before starting olmesartanMedication taken regularly by patients on the Marshall Protocol for its ability to activate the Vitamin D Receptor. Also known by the trade name Benicar. .

You would be surprised where those hidden sources of D turn up. Some on the MP have found

that they had to forgo grain beers, realized they were eating foods with mushrooms in them,

taking a “harmless supplement” with D in it, or discovered their yogurt or ice cream was made

with D fortified milk … to name a few scenarios.

Joyful, MarshallProtocol.com

Avoid foods containing supplemental folic acid

Bacteria use folic acid to synthesize the nucleic acids that make up their DNA. MP patients

should read the nutritional label and ingredients list on all packaged foods at the time of each

purchase and look for the words “folic acid.” Note that foods naturally high in folate, a natural

source of folic acid, such as leafy green vegetables are permitted.

• “enriched “ white or whole wheat flour

• products made from “enriched” flours - breads, baked goods, cereals

• processed foods supplemented with folic acid

• most multivitamins

• folic acid supplements

• B-vitamin complexes

Avoid foods and substances which may exacerbate the disease process, are

immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory

• certain additives - aspartame, monosodium glutamate (MSG), tartrazine (FD&C Yellow

#5)

• soy, soy oil and tofu - contains phytoestrogens, which may block the Vitamin D

Receptor (VDR) in large enough quantities

• Foods high amounts of omega-3 or omega-6 oils – these oils are immunosuppressive.

Seeds (sunflower, sesame, flax, chia, pumpkin, also known as pepita), seed oils

(sunflower, safflower, flaxseed, grapeseed), avocado and avocado oil

• food and drink that contains chlorogenic acid, which may block the Vitamin D Receptor

in large enough quantities, such as coffee, tea, fruit skins

• grapefruit and possibly starfruit appear to interfere with vitamin D metabolism1

should therefore be avoided

• Foods high in potassium, if pain in the kidneys becomes a problem (bananas, dry beans,

dried apricots, the skins of fruits and vegetables, electrolyte replacement drinks)

Alcohol does not appear to exacerbate the disease process; consumption is left to individual

discretion. Alcohol can carry a large carbohydrate load, in the form of added sugars or

flavorings.

Recommendations

MP patients should consume a diet low in simple carbohydrates and rich in whole foods. Avoid

highly processed foods, due to the likely presence of undesirable additives, including unlisted

vitamin D. Acceptable foods include the following:

• most vegetables (limit starchy vegetables, such as potatoes)

• low-sugar fruits (such as berries, peaches, and green apples)

• foods that naturally contain folic acid, such as leafy greens

• dairy products that have had minimal processing, or with no more than 6% vitamin A and no

supplemental vitamin D

• a variety of proteins, including that which comes from poultry and most unprocessed meat.

Avoid meat fats and poultry skin

• nuts and seeds not listed above (for example: almonds, walnuts, pine, pecan, pistaschio,

macadamia, hazelnut)

• whole grain products without added vitamin D or folate

• certain artificial sweeteners, such as stevia and sugar alcohols, such as maltitol and xylitol. For some

people, sugar alcohols can cause stomach upset, so use sparingly at first.

• water, generously but not excessively. 8 – 12 oz glasses per day.

• in the event of calcium deficiency, MP patients may need to consume foods high in

calcium

• foods high in fiber, to encourage regularity

Other

• fasting – Fasting is not part of the MP. It is unknown whether it provides harm or benefit

to a person on the treatment.

• food avoidance diets – Some patients have reported sensitivities to certain foods.

Avoiding foods containing, for example, lactose or gluten may offer a decrease in

symptom severity. Patients who feel this may be relevant to them should consult a

nutritionist.

• salt avoidance – not recommended given that the body seems to naturally regulate

sodium levels independently. Salt is also critical for kidney health. Sodium is used by the kidneys to

excrete potassium.

Keywords: foods, drinks, summary, foods to avoid

References

1

Maskalyk J Grapefruit juice: potential drug interactions. CMAJ. 2002;167:279-80.

2

McCarron DA, Geerling JC, Kazaks AG, Stern JS Can dietary sodium intake be modified by

public policy? Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009;4:1878-82.

2

(for more see the Times article Salt, we misjudged

References

1)
Can dietary sodium intake be modified by public policy?
McCarron DA, Geerling JC, Kazaks AG, Stern JS
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol4p1878-82(2009 Nov)
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