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home:othertreatments:pain_medication [09.01.2019]
sallieq [Opioids]
home:othertreatments:pain_medication [09.01.2019] (current)
sallieq [Types of pain medications]
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   * **ketamine** – An anesthetic drug commonly used in Lyme disease and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reports suggested that Ketamine doesn't work very well at palliation, and it loses efficacy quickly as the months go by. Also, Ketamine may damage bladder function.(({{pubmed>long:21684556}}))   * **ketamine** – An anesthetic drug commonly used in Lyme disease and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reports suggested that Ketamine doesn't work very well at palliation, and it loses efficacy quickly as the months go by. Also, Ketamine may damage bladder function.(({{pubmed>long:21684556}}))
   * **morphine** – avoid if possible - shown to be immunosuppressive in a study(({{pubmed>long:9208156}}))   * **morphine** – avoid if possible - shown to be immunosuppressive in a study(({{pubmed>long:9208156}}))
-  * **naltrexone** – an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. Naltrexone would certainly appear to affect the ability of the MP to return the human immune system to full function again. Lymphocytes express opioid receptors, probably for a good reason. Even though that reason is not fully understood, it is not a good idea to block those opioid receptors (with naltrexone) if one expects to be able to return your immune system to normal.+  * **naltrexone** – an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. Naltrexone appears to negatively impact the ability of the MP to return the human immune system to full function again. Lymphocytes express opioid receptors, probably for a good reason. Even though that reason is not fully understood, it is not a good idea to block those opioid receptors (with naltrexone) if one expects to be able to return your immune system to normal.
  
  
home/othertreatments/pain_medication.txt · Last modified: 09.01.2019 by sallieq
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