Home

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
home:pathogenesis:evidence_bacteria [01.13.2020]
sallieq [Other evidence]
home:pathogenesis:evidence_bacteria [01.13.2020]
sallieq [Other evidence]
Line 43: Line 43:
   * **[[transmission|Transmission of disease through blood, bone marrow, organs or other tissues]]** – Organs and tissue from sarcoidosis patients have been known to cause sarcoidosis in the transplanted recipients.(({{pubmed>​long:​12002380}})) (({{pubmed>​long:​7951107}})) (({{pubmed>​long:​11607780}}))   * **[[transmission|Transmission of disease through blood, bone marrow, organs or other tissues]]** – Organs and tissue from sarcoidosis patients have been known to cause sarcoidosis in the transplanted recipients.(({{pubmed>​long:​12002380}})) (({{pubmed>​long:​7951107}})) (({{pubmed>​long:​11607780}}))
   * **Disease appearing in tattoos** – Over the last 40 years, there have been numerous reports of patients developing skin cancer in their tattoos including melanoma, basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and keratoacanthomas.(({{pubmed>​long:​18617744}})) Also, the literature contains multiple reports of sarcoidosis patients developing skin lesions within tattoos. According to one researcher, this is "a well-recognized occurrence in patients with sarcoidosis."​(({{pubmed>​long:​16027303}})) That a tattoo procedure could induce this kind of reaction strongly suggests that diseases such as cancer and sarcoidosis are caused by the introduction of infectious pathogens through contaminated needles. ​   * **Disease appearing in tattoos** – Over the last 40 years, there have been numerous reports of patients developing skin cancer in their tattoos including melanoma, basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and keratoacanthomas.(({{pubmed>​long:​18617744}})) Also, the literature contains multiple reports of sarcoidosis patients developing skin lesions within tattoos. According to one researcher, this is "a well-recognized occurrence in patients with sarcoidosis."​(({{pubmed>​long:​16027303}})) That a tattoo procedure could induce this kind of reaction strongly suggests that diseases such as cancer and sarcoidosis are caused by the introduction of infectious pathogens through contaminated needles. ​
-  * **Disease appearing in scars** – There are several case reports of sarcoidosis lesions forming within scars, which are especially susceptible to infection. That these granuloma often take long periods of time to be realized corresponds with the growth rate of the slow-growing chronic pathogens which the Marshall Pathogenesis implicates in chronic disease.(({{pubmed>​long:​17243430}})) According to one report, a patient developed sarcoid granuloma fully 50 years after his initial injury.(({{pubmed>​long:​19094856}})) Sorabee //et al//​(({{pubmed>​long:​15640432}})) ​write that in addition to reactivation of scars obtained from previous wounds, scar sarcoidosis has been reported at the sites of previous intramuscular injections, blood donation venepuncture sites, scars of herpes zoster,​(({{pubmed>​long:​10086879}})) sarcoidosis on ritual scarification,​(({{pubmed>​long:​2917808}})) and at the sites of allergen extracts for desensitisation.(({{pubmed>​long:​1458650}})) ​+  * **Disease appearing in scars** – There are several case reports of sarcoidosis lesions forming within scars, which are especially susceptible to infection. That these granuloma often take long periods of time to be realized corresponds with the growth rate of the slow-growing chronic pathogens which the Marshall Pathogenesis implicates in chronic disease.(({{pubmed>​long:​17243430}})) According to one report, a patient developed sarcoid granuloma fully 50 years after his initial injury.(({{pubmed>​long:​19094856}})) Sorabee //et al// write that in addition to reactivation of scars obtained from previous wounds(({{pubmed>​long:​15640432}})),​ scar sarcoidosis has been reported at the sites of previous intramuscular injections, blood donation venepuncture sites, scars of herpes zoster,​(({{pubmed>​long:​10086879}})) sarcoidosis on ritual scarification,​(({{pubmed>​long:​2917808}})) and at the sites of allergen extracts for desensitisation.(({{pubmed>​long:​1458650}})) ​
   * **Absence of an effect for most chemicals thought to be toxic** – In contrast to infectious agents, little evidence implicates typical doses of dietary chemicals as primary causes of human cancer. Paul Ewald, PhD has concluded that humans have evolved effective flexible enzymatic systems for degrading potentially carcinogenic chemicals.(({{pubmed>​long:​9255573}})) Even aflatoxins, which are one of the most carcinogenic of dietary constituents,​ may exert their negative effects largely in conjunction with viral infection.(({{pubmed>​long:​9270015}}))   * **Absence of an effect for most chemicals thought to be toxic** – In contrast to infectious agents, little evidence implicates typical doses of dietary chemicals as primary causes of human cancer. Paul Ewald, PhD has concluded that humans have evolved effective flexible enzymatic systems for degrading potentially carcinogenic chemicals.(({{pubmed>​long:​9255573}})) Even aflatoxins, which are one of the most carcinogenic of dietary constituents,​ may exert their negative effects largely in conjunction with viral infection.(({{pubmed>​long:​9270015}}))
   * **Difficulty distinguishing autoimmune disease from infectious disease** – Although they have identified a signature that distinguishes healthy individuals from sarcoidosis or tuberculosis patients, the biosignatures of both diseases are nevertheless very similar. According to the [[http://​www.mpg.de/​5771449/​biosignatures_tuberculosis_sarcoidosis|Max Planck Institute]],​ it is almost impossible to distinguish between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis with just a single signature. A set of different biosignatures is better suited for distinguishing in a first step between diseased and healthy individuals and, in a further step, between the specific diseases.   * **Difficulty distinguishing autoimmune disease from infectious disease** – Although they have identified a signature that distinguishes healthy individuals from sarcoidosis or tuberculosis patients, the biosignatures of both diseases are nevertheless very similar. According to the [[http://​www.mpg.de/​5771449/​biosignatures_tuberculosis_sarcoidosis|Max Planck Institute]],​ it is almost impossible to distinguish between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis with just a single signature. A set of different biosignatures is better suited for distinguishing in a first step between diseased and healthy individuals and, in a further step, between the specific diseases.
home/pathogenesis/evidence_bacteria.txt · Last modified: 01.13.2020 by sallieq
© 2015, Autoimmunity Research Foundation. All Rights Reserved.