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home:pathogenesis:microbiota:lforms [07.01.2019]
sallieq [Future research]
home:pathogenesis:microbiota:lforms [01.12.2020] (current)
sallieq [L-form bacteria]
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 ====== L-form bacteria ====== ====== L-form bacteria ======
  
-As a part of their natural life cycle, bacteria can transform into a variety of forms. One of those phases is the L-form. L-form bacteria, also known as cell wall deficient bacteria, are a phase of bacteria that are very small and lack cell walls. ​+As a part of their natural life cycle, bacteria can transform into a variety of forms. One of those phases is the L-form. ​ 
 + 
 +L-form bacteria, also known as cell wall deficient bacteria, are a phase of bacteria that are very small and lack cell walls. ​
  
 Though the subject of a great deal of research over the last 100 years and implicated in a variety of diseases, L-forms remain largely misunderstood - or at the very least, underappreciated - by the medical research community. According to the Marshall Pathogenesis,​ L-forms are part of a metagenomic microbiota responsible for chronic disease.  ​ Though the subject of a great deal of research over the last 100 years and implicated in a variety of diseases, L-forms remain largely misunderstood - or at the very least, underappreciated - by the medical research community. According to the Marshall Pathogenesis,​ L-forms are part of a metagenomic microbiota responsible for chronic disease.  ​
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 ===== Culturing and detection ===== ===== Culturing and detection =====
  
-Once bacteria have transformed into the L-form they can no longer be detected by many standard ​laboratory procedures. Although scientists have known about L-form bacteria for over a century, many of them have not detected ​them in tissue and blood samples because they are very difficult to culture. ​+Once bacteria have transformed into the L-form they can no longer be detected by ordinary ​laboratory procedures. Although scientists have known about L-form bacteria for over a century, many of them have not been detected in tissue and blood samples because they are very difficult to culture. ​
  
 Forms of bacteria with cell walls can be easily grown outside the body (grown //​[[home:​patients:​assessing_literature:​in_vitro_studies#​in_vitro_studies|in vitro]]//). However L-form bacteria have great difficulty surviving in a foreign environment. In order to grow them successfully in the lab, conditions must be similar to those in the human body (grown [[home:​patients:​assessing_literature:​in_vitro_studies#​in_vivo_studies|in vivo]]). Consequently they can be cultured on a medium called blood agar at very specific temperatures and at a certain pH. Forms of bacteria with cell walls can be easily grown outside the body (grown //​[[home:​patients:​assessing_literature:​in_vitro_studies#​in_vitro_studies|in vitro]]//). However L-form bacteria have great difficulty surviving in a foreign environment. In order to grow them successfully in the lab, conditions must be similar to those in the human body (grown [[home:​patients:​assessing_literature:​in_vitro_studies#​in_vivo_studies|in vivo]]). Consequently they can be cultured on a medium called blood agar at very specific temperatures and at a certain pH.
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 Several studies have shown that once inside a macrophage, L-form bacteria are able to delay the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death, allowing them to thrive inside the cell for a period of time even longer than 45 days. Several studies have shown that once inside a macrophage, L-form bacteria are able to delay the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death, allowing them to thrive inside the cell for a period of time even longer than 45 days.
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 +Life without a wall or division machine in Bacillus subtilis. ​ (({{pubmed>​long:​19212404}})) ​
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 L-form bacteria cohabitants in human blood: significance for health and diseases. (({{pubmed>​long:​28715646}})) L-form bacteria cohabitants in human blood: significance for health and diseases. (({{pubmed>​long:​28715646}}))
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 +Possible role of L-form switching in recurrent urinary tract infection ​ (({{pubmed>​long:​31558767}})) ​
  
 ==== Future research ==== ==== Future research ====
home/pathogenesis/microbiota/lforms.1561956529.txt.gz · Last modified: 07.01.2019 by sallieq
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