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home:pathogenesis:vitamind:longterm [05.26.2019]
sallieq [Immunosuppression and insufficient followup in vitamin D studies]
home:pathogenesis:vitamind:longterm [06.11.2019] (current)
sallieq [Also]
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-[[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=rCs7zF-EfnM|Dr Agus]]+view [[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=rCs7zF-EfnM|Dr Agus]] 
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 +===== Furthermore ===== 
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 +Two recent publications challenge the belief that 25(OH)D levels greater than 30 ng/mL are optimal for bone health. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, high-dose, once-yearly vitamin D therapy increased the incidence of fractures and falls. The second study reported that high-dose vitamin D did not reduce levels of parathyroid hormone or bone resorption among adults with 25(OH)D levels less than 32 ng/mL at baseline. It is time to question whether serum 25(OH)D levels of 30 ng/mL or greater are necessary for all individuals. (({{pubmed>​long:​21369796}})) 
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 +Blood vitamin D levels were associated with a risk of metabolic syndrome in cross-sectional studies but not in longitudinal studies. (({{pubmed>​long:​24423309}})) 
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 +Evidence does not support the use of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of cancer, respiratory infections or rheumatoid arthritis. Similarly, evidence does not support vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis or for improving depression/​mental well-being. Regular testing of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is generally not required, and mega-doses (≥300,000 IU) appear to increase harms. Much of the evidence is at high risk of bias, with multiple flaws, including analyses of secondary endpoints, small and underpowered studies, inconsistent results and numerous other issues. Therefore, enthusiasm for a vitamin D panacea should be tempered.(({{pubmed>​long:​26951286}})) 
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 +New evidence indicates that both high and low 25(OH)D levels may be associated with increased health risks.(({{pubmed>​long:​24600673}})) 
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 +Despite a few hundred systematic reviews and meta-analyses,​ highly convincing evidence of a clear role of vitamin D does not exist for any outcome, but associations with a selection of outcomes are probable.(({{pubmed>​long:​24690624}})) 
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home/pathogenesis/vitamind/longterm.txt · Last modified: 06.11.2019 by sallieq
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