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home:pathogenesis:vitamind [02.13.2019]
sallieq [Notes and comments]
home:pathogenesis:vitamind [05.13.2019] (current)
sallieq [Science behind vitamin D]
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 A number of studies have suggested that patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are deficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D) and that consuming greater quantities of vitamin D, which further elevates 25-D levels, alleviates disease symptoms. A number of studies have suggested that patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are deficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D) and that consuming greater quantities of vitamin D, which further elevates 25-D levels, alleviates disease symptoms.
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 +"The idea that widespread vitamin D deficiency exists in the world has never had any credibility,​ and the idea that vigorous supplementation is necessary therefore has to be false."​
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 +"​Nowadays it is virtually impossible to buy milk in the US that has not been laced (‘fortified’) with vitamin D. The amounts added, and the content, have been subject to dubious control, and a number of fatalities have occurred due to Vitamin D poisoning from milk."
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 +"The mis-labeling of this compound as a vitamin is regrettable,​ as it gave a potential toxin an aura of undeserved innocence. Vitamin D is not a vitamin, but a steroid, which is, in its most active form, a powerful hormone with receptors widely distributed in the tissues of the body. As with other steroids, excessive consumption has risks."​ //Dr Hywel Davies//</​note>​
  
 Some years ago, molecular biology identified 25-D as a secosteroid. Secosteroids would typically be expected to depress inflammation,​ which is in line with the reports of short-term symptomatic improvement. The simplistic first-order mass-action model used to guide the early vitamin studies is now giving way to a more complex description of action. ​ Some years ago, molecular biology identified 25-D as a secosteroid. Secosteroids would typically be expected to depress inflammation,​ which is in line with the reports of short-term symptomatic improvement. The simplistic first-order mass-action model used to guide the early vitamin studies is now giving way to a more complex description of action. ​
home/pathogenesis/vitamind.txt · Last modified: 05.13.2019 by sallieq
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