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home:patients:grappling_uncertainty [07.11.2019]
sallieq [Frequent question]
home:patients:grappling_uncertainty [08.01.2019]
sallieq [Understanding studies]
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 Another common source of questions is recent studies. PubMed has tens of millions of studies. Some of them, many in fact, seem to contradict the conclusions put forth in the Knowledge Base or in the ARF research team's published papers. Often, a critical thinker may be able to apply the evidence and criticisms in the Knowledge Base to a study and make sense of it. Another common source of questions is recent studies. PubMed has tens of millions of studies. Some of them, many in fact, seem to contradict the conclusions put forth in the Knowledge Base or in the ARF research team's published papers. Often, a critical thinker may be able to apply the evidence and criticisms in the Knowledge Base to a study and make sense of it.
    
-An example: one study concluded that vitamin D might lower the incidence of colorectal cancer.(({{pubmed>​long:​17556697}})) A critical thinker might realize that the study was only for four years and might even be able to find studies over a longer period, which contradicted the original study'​s findings.(({{pubmed>​long:​12117397}})) +An example: one study concluded that vitamin D might lower the incidence of colorectal cancer.(({{pubmed>​long:​17556697}})) A critical thinker might realize that the study was only for four years and might even be able to find studies over a longer period, which contradicted the original study'​s findings. ​See (({{pubmed>​long:​18065602}})), (({{pubmed>​long:​17991672}})),​ (({{pubmed>​long:​18326620}})),​ (({{pubmed>​long:​18326621}})) and select OXFORD//​academic// ​ to read the comments.
  
 Using statistical inferences, John P. A. Ioannidis concluded in the prestigious journal //PLoS Medicine// that half of published research must be wrong.(({{pubmed>​long:​16060722}})) The arguments of that paper are beyond the scope of this article; but in grappling with a confusing study, it's seriously worth considering how Ioannidis could be right. ​ Using statistical inferences, John P. A. Ioannidis concluded in the prestigious journal //PLoS Medicine// that half of published research must be wrong.(({{pubmed>​long:​16060722}})) The arguments of that paper are beyond the scope of this article; but in grappling with a confusing study, it's seriously worth considering how Ioannidis could be right. ​
home/patients/grappling_uncertainty.txt · Last modified: 08.01.2019 by sallieq
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