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home:diseases:acute_respiratory [02.11.2019]
sallieq [Notes and comments]
home:diseases:acute_respiratory [08.12.2019]
sallieq [Types of acute respiratory infections]
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 While it is certainly possible to contract an acute respiratory infection while on the Marshall Protocol, many symptoms of immunopathology mimic those of an acute respiratory infection. Adjusting one's antibiotics or olmesartan (Benicar) can sometimes help a patient distinguish between the two. The MP tends to make no difference to the course of a common cold. Patients with acute respiratory infections can manage their infections with antiviral agents as well as medicines which palliate symptoms. While it is certainly possible to contract an acute respiratory infection while on the Marshall Protocol, many symptoms of immunopathology mimic those of an acute respiratory infection. Adjusting one's antibiotics or olmesartan (Benicar) can sometimes help a patient distinguish between the two. The MP tends to make no difference to the course of a common cold. Patients with acute respiratory infections can manage their infections with antiviral agents as well as medicines which palliate symptoms.
  
-===== Types of acute respiratory infections ===== 
  
-  * **common cold** – A mild viral infection involving the nose and respiratory passages but not the lungs. Caused primarily by rhinoviruses. The symptoms of a cold usually resolve after about one week, but can last up to three weeks. 
-  * **flu (influenza)** – Caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae,​ flu is an acute contagious disease of the upper airways and lungs, which rapidly spreads around the world in seasonal epidemics. It can be difficult to distinguish between the common cold and influenza in the early stages of an acute infection, but usually the symptoms of the flu are more severe than their common-cold equivalents. Most people who get influenza will recover in one to two weeks, but others will develop life-threatening complications such as pneumonia. ​ 
-  * **pneumonia** – An inflammatory illness of the lung. Upper respiratory infections are rarely serious but can lead to pneumonia, which may present a serious challenge for patients with severely-compromised respiratory function, as is sometimes the case with sarcoidosis. 
-  * **strep throat ** – Also known as streptococcal pharyngitis,​ strep throat is an infection that affects the pharynx and possibly the larynx and tonsils. Strep is contagious and must be treated. Strep infections left untreated can migrate to other areas such as the joints and internal organs. Patients who think they have strep infection should see their doctor for an assessment. ​ Strep throat cannot be diagnosed definitively without a culture. Titers can stay postive for a long time from past infections. While penicillin is still the drug of choice for strep infection, penicillin can foster the growth of chronic bacteria. Patients who are candidates for penicillin may wish to ask their physician for an alternative to penicillin such as claforan (Cefotaxime). ​ 
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-Viruses account for most upper respiratory infections, but physicians must be alert to signs of bacterial primary infection or superinfection,​ which may require targeted therapy. 
  
  
home/diseases/acute_respiratory.txt · Last modified: 08.12.2019 by sallieq
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